Saturday, 21 September 2013

Mabon Blog Hop: The Making of the Meadow

©McCracken & Worthington
Welcome to another Tarot Blog Hop!  You may have hopped forward from Tarot Trends, or back from Pure Blessed Tarot, depending on which way round you like to go.  Or maybe you found your way here from the Celtic Lenormand Facebook page, or somehow else.  Whatever the case, I hope you'll make your way round the hop, there are sure to be plenty of interesting posts!  And if you get lost along the way, here's the Master List.

For this hop, our wrangler, Christiana Gaudet, invited us to look at myth as it connects to the cards.  What I'd like to offer is a look at the card that I chose to represent this spoke on the Wheel of the Year in the Celtic Lenormand, and the myths that might be associated with it.

In traditional decks, this card would be the Garden.  While there is much evidence of the Celts being involved in agriculture, there is little evidence of them having gardens.  And those they did have were more of the kitchen-garden variety.  Whereas the Lenormand garden was originally based on the Parisian (or generally city) practice of going for a walk or ride in the local gardens to see and be seen.  It is connected with socialising, events, and hospitality, as well as our public persona.

To represent that idea, I decided to rename the card Meadow, and show a space prepared for the gathering of a village or tribe to celebrate the Mabon harvest, focused more on fruits than on wheat, though that is present, too.  Of course, one myth we see here is that of celebrating Mabon.

There is plenty of discussion as to whether or not people in the past actually celebrated any or all of the 'pagan' festivals which are highlighted today.   And strangely, the myths associated with Mabon refer to Beltaine as the time of his birth and to the Winter Solstice as the time of his rescue from imprisonment by King Arthur's knights.

The naming of the second harvest for Mabon is probably a later pagan association, connecting with the idea of the cyclical battle between the Summer and Winter Gods.  The young Son/God defeats the old to win a wife and continue the cycle of life, bringing fruitfulness to the earth.  The time when Mabon is imprisoned could be associated with the harvest and the storing up of those fruits over the winter.

Yet, even if Mabon is a name only later associated with the time of harvest, there is clear evidence of harvest festivals from the past.  Though they may not have fallen on this exact date, the fact of giving thanks for the fruits of the season would have been a common occurrence.  And gathering to celebrate that as a village or tribe would have been one of the times when groups came together, seeing friends old and new, telling tales of the trials of the year, and generally socialising and putting on a public face.  So, though not exactly a Garden, the Meadow fits the spirit of the Lenormand card, and the spirit of this turn of the Wheel.

Now, for more myths and cards, please hop on over to Pure Blessed Tarot.

24 comments:

  1. THAT is one beautiful card... Can't wait for the deck to come out so I can dive into Lenormand :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you like it, Olivia! Will is a very talented artist, I was so lucky to get him in on this project :)

      Delete
  2. Another exquisite card! I'm another who is eagerly awaiting this deck. Lovely post - Happy Mabon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy Mabon to you, too, Margo! Always nice to hear when people like what they see of this deck :)

      Delete
  3. The colors in this one are so lovely. I'm really enjoying watching the birth of this deck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, given the hand you had in helping it become a reality, I'm happy you like the deck!

      Delete
  4. Chloe!!! Have that damn webinar to teach me to read Lenormand! I love that beautiful Garden card. When I can read Lenormand, I'll rename it my carrot patch:D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Joanna, I've heard that Mary Greer is going to have a six week webinar course for people to learn Lenormand, which would definitely be worth looking into!

      Delete
  5. Thanks Chloe... it was most delightful to rest a while in your meadow :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Feel free to come back any time, Karen ;)

      Delete
  6. Lovely, Chloe! I am so glad you wrote about Mabon in this context - myth, seasonal change, pagan history and the birthing of a new deck. Fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Christiana! I loved the excuse to dig around in mythology ;)

      Delete
  7. That's a beautiful card, Chloe - I'm now a convert to the colour images :-) Looking forward to seeing the finished deck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha, glad you're finally coming around to the colour images :) I love the warmth and breadth of Will's colour palette!

      Delete
  8. Wonderful transformation making The Garden into The Meadow. What a great twist for this spoke of The Wheel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I say, it felt more true to the spirit of the card that way, for that time :) So, not traditional, but hopefully still readable!

      Delete
  9. Meadow is a beautiful name to give to the Garden and the illustration is gorgeous - of course! Deck is looking wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's strange, I thought it would be easier once I could finally hand things off to US Games. Now, though, I'm left twiddling my thumbs, wondering when I'll actually get my hands on the final cards, and what they'll look like - as much in the dark as anyone else! Ah well, it'll all come out in the wash, as they say, and Will's art will shine through whatever :)

      Delete
  10. Great card. Kudos to both you and Will for translating the Lenormand so well out of its accustomed time-space location. And thanks for the enlightenment on the actual history of the Mabon legend as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Joanne. It certainly had its challenges, but I hope we've done honour to both the Lenormand system and the celtic tradition :)

      Delete
  11. An interesting blog post Chloë. The earliest meanings for the Park or Garden simply focus on association, with the cards around it describing to whom you’ll be introduced. The closer it was the querent’s card brings lasting friendships, and if it was far away, beware of false friendships. Basically communal mixing lol.

    The card does look very nice, I know a number of my students are eagerly awaiting it. I’m not sure it’ll be one for me, though sorry :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad the cards aren't as dreadful as you initially feared, Andy. And if it's not your cup of tea, so be it. There's room for lots of flavours in the world :)

      Delete
  12. Nice card. And thanks for the research. It's nice to know where things come from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Cassandra, glad you like the card! And I agree, I've always loved seeing what's behind things :D

      Delete

We love comments, let us know what you think :)