Thursday, 1 August 2013

Sharing with Community: The Making of The Scythe

©McCracken & Worthington
Welcome to another Tarot Blog Hop!  You may have hopped in from Christiana's Tarot Trends, or from Cassandra's Quick Card Reading, depending on which way round you like to go.  Or maybe you found your way here from the Celtic Lenormand Facebook page, or somehow else.  Whatever the case, I hope you'll make your way round the hop, there's sure to be plenty of interesting posts!  And if you get lost along the way, here's the Master List.

This time around we are looking at Lammas, Loafmass, August Eve, or First Harvest.  Our wrangler, the fabulous Arwen, asked us: "What can you share from your table with your community?"  In the past, what was most often shared at this time of year was the first bread of the season, as suggested by the name Loafmass.  And what I will share is the card I chose to represent this time of year, as there are cards allocated in this deck to each of the pagan festivals, which can be used for timing in a reading.

©McCracken & Worthington
For this time, the Scythe seemed the obvious Lenormand choice.  A Scythe, after all, is used to harvest wheat to make bread.  That doesn't mean to say that I only see the Scythe in terms of harvesting.  For me, it's still about something that is cutting, sharp, possibly painful.  It can be a clean break, or a surgical procedure, or making the cut in an exam.  Cutting and harvesting link up.  After all, some people see the harvest as the Summer God sacrificing himself, being cut down in his prime, so that the village, tribe or community can survive the winter.  And when we make the cut in an exam, or break off a relationship, or have surgery, we harvest the consequences of those actions or situations.

As you can see, the direction that the Scythe is pointing changed between Will's original sketch and the final image.  Traditionally, many people read the card towards which the Scythe's tip is pointed as the one that is being cut.  (Some people see the handle side as being a bit of a thump, but not sharp in the same way.)  And most traditionally, that sharp tip points to the right.  After some thought, I decided to go with tradition on that one...

I hope that you enjoyed sharing this glimpse into the making of this deck, and that you will carry on hopping with Cassandra's Quick Card Reading.

28 comments:

  1. I'd pick the Scythe too, if I were using the Lenormand for this. Definitely 'letting go' time - or time to cut away what's no longer useful. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Glad it's not just me :) Thanks for commenting!

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  2. The Scythe is an excellent image for this time of year. I love the artwork for this card... can't wait to see the completed deck :)

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    1. It's nearly there, Sharon :) I'm just editing up the last of the images, hope to send everything off by the end of next week...

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  3. This is truly a beautiful card. I like the idea that some of the cards from this deck represent the pagan festivals. It gives the deck more depth

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    1. Well, I've never been much of a fan of most Lenormand timing systems, so I thought I'd offer up a simplified pagan version. And people can use it or not, as they like, as it doesn't affect the card images anyway :)

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  4. Lovely artwork - nice choice, Chloe :)

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    1. Thanks, Viv. I know Will was quite excited about the technique, combining watercolours and egg tempera, with detail at the front and a softer look at the back :) I agree, I think it's come out beautifully!

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  5. I love the expression of cards being designed one way and then flipped and then the flip feels more spot on! Thanks for the artistic nourishment from your table, Chloe!

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    1. Glad you feel the flip works, Jordan. I sort of feel it could go either way, but then I'm a bit like that generally ;)

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  6. Interesting that you chose to flip it. The original seems to feel more 'right' to me somehow :)

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    1. I wonder if that's because you prefer the black-and-white, Ania... :)

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  7. The scythe is an excellent image for now and 2013 all the way around!

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    1. Glad you think so, Cassandra. As my son approaches surgery, I certainly hope so - that we will harvest something positive from the fear and discomfort...

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  8. Thank you for sharing the creative process, Chloe. When I pick up Lenormand, I will always remember this post;)

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    1. Ha, I can't wait for you to learn this Joanna. I'm sure you will find many beautiful insights from it, as you have with tarot, and expand your ways of helping your clients, too :)

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  9. Thanks for sharing Chloe... I am lost in thought now on left handed and right handed scythes... and trying to remember how my Granddad use to swing one around many many moons ago... :-)

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    1. I'm pretty sure this is a right-handed scythe, but it's an interesting question :)

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    1. Hi Olivia,
      Thanks, glad you like it :)

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  11. Such a great project, Chloe! When this Lenormand comes out, I shall have a dilemma between it and my Gilded Reverie from Ciro Marchetti. I do like the way you've integrated the Celtic traditions into the very different Lenormand system. The cards still work, and the Scythe is perfect for haymaking season!

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    1. Hi Joanne,
      I'm really glad you like how I'm integrating Celtic traditions into the deck. As I always say, it's intended as something people can take or leave, and will still be a readable Lenormand deck by traditional standards :) As for your dilemma, you could always alternate ;)

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  12. Interesting to see the Scythe show up again in the hop. I'm learning more about the Lenormand cards. Very helpful with the explanation of what is being pointed to!

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    1. Ha ha, we'll get you reading Lenormand cards yet, Arwen :D

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  13. You mention corn, but the image is of wheat or hay.
    We can make cornbread certainly, but wheat is easier to eat :)

    This is an absolutely gorgeous deck, you make a great team.
    Sharyn/AJ

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    1. You're quite right, Sharyn, my bad - even though I'm a city girl, I do know the difference. Have corrected it :)

      Glad you like the cards - Will's art is so gorgeous!
      Chloë

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  14. I want your deck madly! :) We chose the same card for the Lammas post <3 Love it!

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    1. Hee hee, very cool! Hope to get round to yours this weekend (I've nearly done the full round now) :)

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